Interviews can be tough.

When you sit down with someone you’ve never met before, answering personal questions about your work history and experience can be awkward.

The key to acing an interview? Being prepared for those rough questions.

We want to write articles perfectly matched to your interview question concerns. So take our poll and let us know what questions you want help with! We’ll use your responses when creating content for 2019.

Which Interview Questions Do You Need Help With?

Thanks for voting in our poll! Feel free to tell us more about why certain interview questions are hard for you in the comments section below!

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Source: Moving on up

    

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We’re proud to introduce Job Journey

For more than a decade, Movin’ On Up has offered career advice and job search help for job seekers of all ages. But the Movin’ On Up name doesn’t really fit our mission. We’re about so much more than climbing the corporate ladder. Not everyone wants to be a manager, vice-president, or CEO. And that’s okay. No matter what path your career takes, employment is a journey.

To build a brand that better aligns with the soul of our blog, we are rebranding to Job Journey in January 2019. The site will have a fresh look, and be easier to use.

Getting a job isn’t a one-step process. There are several steps for job seekers, including revamping your resume, interviewing, receiving a job offer, and finally accepting the offer before your first day on the job. And that doesn’t even take into account everything that comes after.

We want to celebrate every milestone of your “job journey,” so that’s what we’ll call ourselves.

And what better way to celebrate this announcement than with a list of our greatest hits? Here are our top 10 blogs of all time.

  1. So, You Left a Toxic Work Culture—How Do You …read more

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So, tell me a bit about your experience.

“Tell me about yourself.” “Could you speak about your previous work experience and how it’s shaped you as an employee?” “Oh, this job on your resume sounds interesting. Could you tell me more about it?”

These phrases are all essentially alternate ways of asking you about your experience, which eventually comes up in every interview.

However, interviewers aren’t looking for your life story. They want to know specifics on how your individual experience makes you the ideal candidate for the job.

Here’s how to give them the information they are looking for.

Keep It Short

If the experience question is open-ended (Tell me about yourself, Can you speak on your experience?, etc.), keep your answer specific. Keep a running list of your top three achievements/most impactful job experiences and keep you answer to those top three. You don’t need to cover your entire job history in one question.

Try not to go beyond a minute in your response. When you practice, time yourself to make sure you don’t end up going over that time limit. Allot specific chunks of time for each work experience so you don’t end up talking too much about one experience over …read more

Source: Moving on up

    

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College is expensive. According to U.S. News, the average tuition and fees at an in-state public college comes out to $9,716, compared with $35,676 for private colleges per year. Public, out-of-state schools cost about $21,629 on average per year.

Despite these high sticker prices, survey results from Movin’ On Up, the Express Employment Professionals blog for job seekers, and Refresh Leadership Express’ blog for business leaders, found that parents are still pushing their children to attend college.

Interestingly, 33 percent of business leaders and 33 percent of job seekers (coincidentally the same percentage) said that their parent/guardian encouraged them to achieve a four-year college degree or higher.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 66.7 percent of high school graduates ages 16 to 24 were enrolled in colleges or universities in October 2017. These relatively high college attendance rates resulted in soaring student loan debt. As noted in Forbes, according to Make Lemonade, more than 44 million U.S. borrowers collectively owe $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. Global News notes that Canadian students collectively owe over $28 billion in student loans.

Although college can be …read more

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Yup, you read that right.

Today is Thanksgiving. A day to eat, spend time with friends, eat more, be thankful for life’s blessings, and, finally, eat again.

In summary, there’s a lot of food. And the main course on practically everyone’s table? Turkey.

But what is a turkey? As defined by Merriam-Webster, the top three turkey definitions are:

  1. “A large North American gallinaceous bird (Meleagris gallopavo) that is domesticated in most parts of the world.
  2. Failure, flop, especially: a theatrical production that has failed.
  3. Three successive strikes in bowling.”

Interestingly, each one of these definitions applies to the job search. Don’t believe us? Stop packing on the pounds with pumpkin pie and read on.

You’re One Turkey Among Many

Turkey: A large North American gallinaceous bird (Meleagris gallopavo) that is domesticated in most parts of the world.

Courtesy of Merriam-Webster, “gallinaceous” means: “Of or relating to an order (Galliformes) of heavy-bodied largely terrestrial birds including the pheasants, turkeys, grouse, and the common domestic chicken.”

So basically, gangly birds that travel in packs.

When you’re a job seeker, you’re just one applicant among many. One turkey among hundreds. You keep hoping to find something great, but it can seem like you’re just wasting your time.

Don’t lose faith! …read more

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Job interview anxiety got you down? We’re here to help.

Being nervous isn’t a bad thing. It’s your body’s fight-or-flight response trying to protect you. But sometimes that normal response can be overpowering, causing you to doubt yourself and flub questions.

Luckily, it’s possible to reduce those nervous feelings with a few techniques.

Prepare

The best way to reduce interview question-related anxiety is to already know the answers to any questions your interviewer could ask. Although you might not be able to figure out every single topic they could quiz you on, a quick online search can teach you quite a bit about your potential employer.

Research everything you can about the company. Know a bit of the company’s history, the company culture, and see if you can find any information about your interviewer.

Next, find out where you fit with this company. What is it that you can do in this position that nobody else can do? Come in with specific statistics if you can (for instance, increased page views by ___%, reduced customer service call time by ___%, increased product turnover time by ___$, improved your safety rating to ___ level, etc.).

Prepare answers to the most frequently asked interview questions, like …read more

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You’re tired of working and ready to retire, so what’s stopping you?

Maybe you can’t afford it yet. Or perhaps you don’t want to stop working because you enjoy it. You want more time to dedicate to your family or hobbies, but aren’t quite ready to give your job up and retire. So, regardless of reason, you keep working.

The Good

But working forever isn’t the only option. There’s another way to ease out of the workforce—phased retirement.

Not sure what that means? Investopedia defines phased retirement as including “a broad range of employment arrangements that allow an employee who is approaching retirement age to continue working with a reduced workload, and eventually transition from full-time work to full-time retirement.”

In other words, phased retirement allows you to work in a part-time capacity for a certain time period before you start full-time retirement. You get to keep working for longer, while employers get the benefit of you passing on your knowledge and experience before heading off to retirement.

Sounds enticing, right?

The Bad

A study published by the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, as reported by Forbes, notes that 77% of employers believe many of their employees want to …read more

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Scare off the competition with your newly expanded vocabulary

Ghosts and ghouls are garish and ghastly. Zombies are zealous in their pursuit of brains. And warlocks are wild in their suspiciously suspect spellcasting.

But there is one creature more frightening, foul, and fatal than all the rest:

Your resume.

Only a select few enjoy resume-writing. For the rest of us, the onerous activity can seem like an exercise in futility, akin to trying to melt a witch wearing a water-resistant wetsuit.

You must get your foot in the door to score a job, and, unless you’re a zombie with the ability to throw your actual foot through the literal door, you’ll need a tip-top resume to get past the scanning robots and secure an interview.

Here are the tastiest words to make sure you don’t get eaten by the competition.

Words That Show You Take Initiative

You want to show your potential employer you didn’t twiddle your thumbs and do the bare minimum in your previous positions. Use these words to show you’re eerily experienced, and that you originated new and complex programs:

  • Redesigned
  • Revamped
  • Launched (a new project, blog, program, team activity, regular event, etc).
  • Established
  • Introduced
  • Pioneered
  • Spearheaded

Words That Show You Are Results-Driven

Employers want results. Would you hire a ghost that scared “a …read more

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Here’s what the employment scene looks like.

To get a better picture of how the economy is doing (and how that affects your chances of getting a new job this winter), we surveyed business owners, decision makers, and human resource professionals about hiring trends in their markets and how they impact hiring decisions.

Business leaders predict an optimistic end to an overall strong year.

Forty-eight percent of survey respondents expect an upward trend in employment for the fourth quarter. This is up 14% over the first quarter of this year. On average throughout the year, less than 9% of survey respondents said they expected a downward trend in employment activity. Even more encouraging, 92% of companies do not plan to eliminate positions in key segments during the fourth quarter.

Jobs you may want to consider:

The top 5 segments hiring in the fourth quarter of 2018 include:

  • General Labor (Industrial): 37%
  • Skilled Labor (Industrial): 30%
  • Administrative/Office Clerical: 21%
  • Accounting/Finance: 10%
  • Engineering: 9%

The jobs are there, but access to top talent continues to plague businesses.
There are jobs available, but the competition among businesses to recruit workers with the right mix of skills and expertise needed to fill them is fierce. In fact, 65% of survey respondents reported a “lack of …read more

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Is a later-in-life internship right for you?

Remember the movie The Intern? It wasn’t full of superheroes throwing trucks or giant dinosaurs eating people, but it was a great flick nonetheless.

Robert De Niro plays a retired executive who has trouble adjusting to his empty schedule and decides to join a senior citizen intern program. The film is hilarious, but has plenty of heart, too.

Ok, enough with the film review (although, yeah, you should absolutely see it). The interesting bit here is that The Intern is not too far off the mark. Plenty of people, not just seniors, are looking to get back into the workforce. In fact, many of those over the age of 40 have chosen to explore internships (or returnships, as some folks call them).

Why?

Here’s what Carol Fishman Cohen, CEO of iRelaunch, an organization dedicated to assisting people with re-entry into the workforce, had to say on Today.

“These are a great vehicle for people returning to work. The word ‘internship’ is just a label, but it really covers any kind of short-term, non-binding work arrangement.”

Not convinced? It’s true that not getting any sort of payor compensation can make the concept hard to swallow. However, here …read more

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